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Every Time I Die

Keith Buckley Says Every Time I Die’s New Album Is A Return To “Lighthearted, Jovial Lyrical Content”


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Every Time I Die frontman Keith Buckley appeared on recently shared episode of ‘The Peer Pleasure Podcast‘ and in part discussed the band’s forthcoming ninth studio album. Completed this past spring with producer Will Putney (Thy Art Is Murder, Terror), the group have opted to thus far keep it under wraps until they can tour on it.

While the band’s latest effort, 2016’s “Low Teens“, chronicled Buckley‘s experience during the troubled birth of his daughter Zuzana which was fraught with complications, he has revealed that this new album finds him in a more playful state of mind. He said of that:

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“…We actually have a new record recorded. We wrote and recorded it, and then two weeks later, the pandemic hit. So, we’re just sitting on it, but we’re not going to do anything with it until we can tour again, because it deserves… You know, I mean everyone’s everyone’s music deserves to be toured on, if they put everything into it that they, you know, hold sacred which is what you try to do when you’re in a recording studio.

So we we don’t want to just like throw it into the into the furnace of online content that gets absorbed and quickly shit out while people are binge watching shows and, you know, trying to find ways to distract themselves from the truth that the you know the world is, you know, pretty much dilapidating around us.

But uh yeah, so were hoping that the band start touring again soon. But I will say that, like, the writing for this album. And I was very, very, very fucking excited about touring on this album, because it’s just such a different album as far as like the attitude of it. I was very excited to realize that I kind of got back to the playfulness of old ETID, you know. So I do feel like this is this is on par.

I mean I honestly, I honestly honestly feel like this is the best record and after we did ‘Low Teens‘, I was like, ‘okay, there’s no chance I’m ever going to write like this again’ and I feel like ‘Low Teens‘ was the first time anyone really took me seriously as a writer, because there was no, you know, no like cheap humor in it, you know none of those like devices that I use, because they were fun.

It was just very serious and I found a way to to appropriately translate what I was thinking and going through. And a lot of people recognized that. And it was, as far as what I saw about like reviews and things it was, you know, this is his…. these are his best lyrics.

So I knew that I was never going to top that and I was like if I know I’m not going to do that, then why why would I even do another record? Like I just I can’t imagine having an experience that’s going to inspire lyrics that could be more of what that is, you know? And I don’t I don’t think I want to. So I don’t know if there’s a point to doing it.

So I kind of argued, you know with myself, about that as an internal conflict, but I was like okay fuck it. I’m in a band, bands make make records, well let’s fucking make a record. So I did and, you know, sat down to start writing and found out that I was having fun with it again, music was fun to me again.

So, I think that anybody that got into ETID because of the lighthearted, jovial lyrical content or anything that miss that from ‘Low Teens‘, get that back in spades now.

I think it’s just so much better than any of our other records and it feels like a new band again. Which is wild, because the last record was about a birth and, you know, it was very much a rebirth of us too and this is our first. This is our first offering after that rebirth, so it feels like a brand new band to me. I’m really excited to get back out there.”

You can hear the entire interview over at this location.

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