THEPRP REVIEWS

The Chariot One Wing

Good Fight Music/eOne Music

Fully taking flight.

The Chariot - One Wing

24

Since their inception The Chariot‘s chaotic live performances have continually outshined their recorded output. It’s not that the band have ever put out a bad album. But rather that they never seemed able to fully translate their onstage chaos to a studio recording—even with incredibly ambitious live takes.

One Wing” is the album that changes that. A truly caustic, seething son of a bitch of a record. One that melds the searing eardrum puncturing noise of Converge and Botch with the smug melodic hardcore/punk ingenuity of Refused and Every Time I Die.

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It’s a harrowing experience that knows nothing of restraint. Ragged screeching riffs, a dense rhythmic pummel and auxiliary instrumentation aplenty; the band quite simply just go for it—delivering a empowering blast of pure emotional expression. As evidenced by the track listing, which tells a story in itself, artistry is key when it comes to “One Wing“. The band either feel they have nothing left to lose or have truly become fearless.

Full-blown screaming over an Ennio Morricone-styled spaghetti western outro that sports, horns, galloping percussion and a sampled whip crack (see “First“) is not the choice of a band out to play it safe. Nor is “Speak“, which finds vocalist Josh Scogin spilling his guts over bleak piano chords.

It’s this aspiration and devil may care recklessness that makes “One Wing” such a crucial listen—especially given its range. “Your” throws a curveball with a female soulfully crooning over delicate ambiance; while a song like “Not” intentionally clips vocals just to make them all the more abrasive.

Cheek.” is perhaps the boldest step for the band however; doing little to mask Scogin‘s exasperated breaths distorting the mic. An incendiary performance that holds particular gravitas as it directly follows a barely abridged airing of Charlie Chaplin‘s life-affirming speech from the 1940 film, “The Great Dictator“.

In a scene where software has muted emotion and digital perfection has eradicated the human element, The Chariot have delivered an album that practically spits blood through your speakers. It’s an enormously powerful experience. A violent aural catharsis that thumbs its nose at commercial accessibility; while simultaneously ripping its heart out just so that you may hear its enraged beating all the louder.

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